Tips for Dealing With A Difficult Boss

Tips for Dealing With A Difficult Boss

Expert Author Susan Leigh
Do you ever feel that you are a disappointment to your boss, that he or she wishes they'd appointed someone else instead of you, that you're not good enough? Dealing with a difficult boss can be a stressful position to be in and feeling that way can in itself succeed in making the situation worse.
As a child we are programmed to survive. We look to our elders and 'betters' to help us, to teach us the necessary skills to live life well and to be able to successfully negotiate our way through everyday and problem situations. We look to our parents, older siblings, school teachers as being the fountain of all knowledge. Being liked, receiving praise and reassurance that everything is fine is an important component in gaining confidence in our ability to cope.
Once we move into a work environment our boss can inherit that important role. Certainly in the early days we want to please our boss, receive recognition that we have done a good job, be praised for our efforts. Work situations though are often not geared to those expectations and we have to learn another way of dealing with the verbal and non-verbal messages we receive.
If we end up in a work situation where our boss appears to be short-tempered, irritable, impatient it can be hard not to take his or her behaviour personally. Dealing with a difficult boss, though needs to be taken in context, rather than automatically feeling that we are the cause of those problems, that we are in someway to blame.
Here are some tips for dealing with a difficult boss:
- He or she may be having a stressful time at work. Many businesses are struggling to survive. Cash flow is tough and competition fierce, there may not be enough work to sustain the business, or ongoing pressure from senior management. A boss can feel that he is being pulled in all directions, trying to keep everyone happy whilst being required to work longer and harder than ever before.
Targets, staff management, meetings, new business acquisition all add pressure to an already busy day. Try to appreciate some of the pressure that your boss may be under. Yes, he gets paid to do his job, but it can still be tough feeling alone and unsupported.
- He may feel disrespected by his staff. Many businesses are expecting staff to forgo pay rises, to work more flexibly, to take up the slack when staff leave. This can mean that staff become disgruntled and dissatisfied. Sometimes a boss can feel that he is stuck in the middle, between management and staff. Both sides make valid points but can find it difficult to appreciate each others arguments as to why things are the way they are. Regular briefing sessions, staff training, team building, two-way communications, can make an important difference to strained staff relations.
As an individual, be aware of ways that you can offer to help. By being flexible in your approach to work you support the company and ultimately their ability to stay in business and provide you with a job. Also by being interested in your work you make your role more satisfying and fulfilling.
- A difficult boss may have personal problems of which other people are unaware. It is unprofessional to take personal problems to work, but if someone is struggling with relationship, family, health problems these issues can unintentionally impact on a person's work performance. It can be hard to concentrate and focus at work when one's priorities are being influenced by important personal considerations.
And away from work it can be hard to relax, sleep, and take an effective break if there are serious matters that need attention. Dealing with a difficult boss means fighting the temptation to judge or be too critical of his behaviour. Appreciate that there may be more to the situation than you are aware of. By remaining pleasant, even-tempered and calm you will often find that it makes a big improvement to the atmosphere.
- Appreciate that people have different personalities and temperaments. Dealing with a difficult boss may simply mean accepting that two very different people do not actually like each other. The important skill is in respecting each other enough to be able to work together. As a child it matters to us that we are liked, popular, accepted. Work environments are often very different.
Functioning as an adult means learning to co-exist with people who are different to ourselves. It involves learning respect, acceptance and tolerance, all important qualities to bring into the world of adult relationships.

0 Comments :

HOODLES

Gumbo beet greens corn soko endive gumbo gourd. Parsley shallot courgette tatsoi pea sprouts fava bean collard greens dandelion.

JACKETS & SUIT

Gumbo beet greens corn soko endive gumbo gourd. Parsley shallot courgette tatsoi pea sprouts fava bean collard greens dandelion.

SPORT SHOES

Gumbo beet greens corn soko endive gumbo gourd. Parsley shallot courgette tatsoi pea sprouts fava bean collard greens dandelion.

 
Created By SoraTemplates | Distributed By Gooyaabi Templates